Re-Imagine: Voyager

Here's an article about one of the amazing projects to come out of YES Disability, featuring some of our very own I-LEAD Organizing Committee:

"Here at YES Disability, we are always looking to celebrate and showcase the diversity of young people with disabilities, This is made even more significant and exciting when those opportunities allow us to showcase other aspects of our young peoples diversity and identity that doesn't necessarly focus on their physical capabilities.

This is exactly the case with one of our newer projects, Re-Imagine:Voyager, where we showcased young people with disabilities dressed in their respective cultural Pasefika attire, and taking photos. The purpose was to chellenge perceptions and break down stigmas that surround the disabilty sector in Pasefika communities, especially concerning ideals and expectations of young people with disabilties in these communities. 

These are then exhibited in numerous locations and art spaces across Auckland, currently being viewed by 4000 people and increasing daily. They are still to be set up in spaces at Silo Park and North Art, with projected viewings to reach in the tens of thousands, and will then possibly be aucitioned off.

Jamie Masters, Youth Participation Coordinator for YES Disability and Project Lead for Re-Imagine: Voyager, was ecstatic about how its all turned out, having been nothing more than an idea on paper to a full-blown art exhibition. She's also proud of how it's garnered so much attention and interest, not just from the families of the young models, but also members of the Office of Disabilty Issues as well as high ranking staff from other disability organisations, such as Dr Monique Faleafa, CEO of Le Va, who partnered with YES Disability to make this happen.

She also had the opportunity to witness how much impact this had on the young models, with them and their families having so much pride in representing there respective nations in an endeavour to make positive change. It was also an enjoyable experience for all the young models involved, some of whom were part of the I-LEAD conference, with others even being part of the I-LEAD Organising Committee itself.

The series is being exhibited in numerous locations and art spaces across Auckland, currently being viewed by 4000 people and increasing daily. They are still to be set up in spaces at Silo Park and North Art, with projected viewings to reach in the tens of thousands, and will then possibly be aucitioned off."

This is just one of many projects to come out of YES with the goals of enabling, developing and enhancing the lives of young people with disabilities in the North Shore, Greater Auckland and all across the nation. The way these are set up would hopefully set a standard to which many of the projects and ideas to come out of I-LEAD will follow or even improve on.